Articles

Articles

THE ‘SWAY BACK’ POSTURE: IDENTIFICATION, CORRECTION AND ITS EFFECT ON INJURIES AND SPORTS PERFORMANCE, dated January 2018

Posture and Postural Types are a source of constant debate, with some authors saying there is no relationship between abnormal posture and pain and dysfunction. Others, however (Kendall, 1992; Sahrmann 2002), have addressed & identified postural dysfunctions and how these change loading on weightbearing joints and affect the biomechanics and kinematics of the adolescent and active individual. Read more

TENDINOPATHY PATHOGENESIS, DIAGNOSIS & REHABILITATION, dated October 2017

A Tendon injury is known as a tendinopathy (NOT tendinitis). It is a non-inflammatory degenerative condition,most commonly due to too much loading. Histologically (at cellular levels) it is associated with changes in the collagen bundles, the tenocytes & the ground substance (proteoglycans, aggrecan & decorin). The end stage is when the disroganised infiltration of new blood vessels into the holes of disrupted matrix is seen. This increased vascularity is not helping to heal, only to fill the holes. The Achilles is the only tendon that can have a midportion tendinopathy. All other tendinopathies are at the tendon attachment to the bone. Read more

SECRETLY STRENGTHENING YOUR CHILD’S CORE: FUN WITH THE PHYSIO BALL, dated September 2017

As adults, most of us have heard of the ‘core’’ or stabilising muscles of the trunk. They are vital to assist in trunk stability, and joint control. The muscles of this ‘abdominal canister’ co‐contract to produce and control intra‐abdominal pressure and assist in stability and load transfer across the lumbo‐pelvic area. These muscles, or ‘core’’, atrophy, or weaken, due to pain and/or sustained postural dysfunction (eg slump sitting). Read more

CROSS-TRAINING IS ESSENTIAL TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE, dated July 2017

So often you’ll read that spending time in the saddle gives you well shaped and toned buttocks. Alas, this couldn’t be further from the truth. For riders who put in extra hours of riding per week, but neglect to train off the bike, the net result can be a weak core, persistent pelvic girdle pain and a visibly wasted butt! One study found that whereas normal humans could hold a static gluteal contraction (hip extension) for 35 seconds, a competitive cyclist could only sustain the same contraction for 5 seconds – that’s a potential weakness of 85% compared to a non-cyclist! Read further to understand how this happens and why cross-training is essential to improve performance, decrease pain and tone that ass. Read more

YOUR ANKLES MATTER, dated March 2017

In recent years, a wealth of valuable research has been done into hip biomechanics. It is well known that the weakness of certain hip muscles, particularly the hip extensors, abductors and lateral rotators (such as Gluteus Maximus and Medius), and the tightness of other hip muscles, especially the hip flexors, adductors and medial rotators, predispose us to poor lower limb alignment, resulting in torsion at the hip, knee and ankle during loading. More detailed discussions of tensor fasciae latae/ITB issues appeared in the July and August editions of Ride. Read more

DON’T BACK DOWN, dated November 2016

Cyclists are vulnerable to lower back pain, but you can protect yourself by working on your core strength. The flexed posture that cyclists have to sustain, while pumping their legs through the down and upstroke, results in progressive overload of the lumbar discs, facets and ligaments, as well as fatigue of the back muscles. All of this causes lower back pain – a common complaint in riders. Read more